Tag Archives: course

The exam results are out! Guide to confirmation and clearing 2010

It’s A-level results day and you finally found out what grades you’ve achieved! You’ll probably be eager to find out if you’ve got into your chosen university course. If you have access to the internet, you’ll be able to check your applicant status from today (19th August) via UCAS Track. Alternatively, you can telephone the university directly.

If you’ve met the conditions of your offer – great! If not, don’t panic, as in some circumstances the admissions tutor may still decide to confirm your offer if you have only narrowly missed the conditions of your offer. If you haven’t met the conditions and find that you are no longer holding an offer, be prepared to contact universities to find out about vacancies through clearing.

What if you haven’t got the grades you were hoping for? Here we look at potential scenarios for applicants who may not have met the conditions of their offers and explore what action they could consider taking.

Contact the University

First of all, try not to stress. If you have narrowly missed the conditions of your offer, the university may still be able to offer you a place if the Admissions Tutor agrees to this. The Tutor’s final decision may be dependent upon how many other applicants holding conditional offers have met their conditions and whether any vacancies remain on the course.

If you’ve missed the conditions of your offer by a larger margin, there may still be a possibility of being accepted onto your chosen course or you may be offered an alternative course by the university. This is very much at the discretion of the Admissions Tutor and you should understand that there’s no guarantee that if you’ve not met the conditions of your offer that the university will still be able to accept you.

In either instance, once you know your results you can contact the university to discuss them. The sooner you get in touch, the sooner you can find out what’s happening with your place. Continue reading The exam results are out! Guide to confirmation and clearing 2010

Mature Students: An Overview of Applying for a University Course

Many students who enter Higher Education do so at a later stage in their lives. There are many reasons why they didn’t enter HE study after they finished their education – they chose a different career path, they may not have had the financial means to study at the time, they may have had other commitments or raised a family or they may not have thought that studying at university was for them at the time. However, it’s never too late to take up an undergraduate course.

It can feel like a minefield when setting out on the path to applying for a course. Whilst prospective students who may be studying for A-levels tend to receive a lot of support for applying to university from their college, mature students don’t always have the same level of access to information and advice. Many universities, like Birmingham City University, have dedicated staff who can help with any questions mature students have about applying for their courses – our Choices department has a dedicated adviser who can help with queries made in person, by email or by phone.

We’ve put together a few key points for mature students to consider to help try and make sense of the process and what sort of things to consider if you’re a mature prospective student and are thinking about applying for a university course. Continue reading Mature Students: An Overview of Applying for a University Course

Parents’ Guide | Part 6: Arriving at University

So, you’ve got through the seemingly endless paperwork of university applications and student finance forms, you’ve done the rounds of university open days, you’ve experienced the nerve-wracking exam results day and now, quite possibly, feel as if you’ve spent a small fortune on kitting your son or daughter out in preparation for them starting their course. Without so much as a chance to catch your breath, the time’s suddenly here for your son or daughter to take the next step in their life.

Continue reading Parents’ Guide | Part 6: Arriving at University

Parents’ Guide | Part 5: The Final Checklist

Have you forgotten anything? Here are a few things you should act upon now if you’ve not already completed them:

  • Student finance forms completed?
  • Accommodation application completed?
  • Place confirmed?
  • Course commencement details received?
  • Exam certificates/ results received?
  • Accommodation confirmed?
  • Student bank account?
  • Insurance arranged?
  • TV licence acquired?
  • Basic living items purchased? (If living away from home)
  • Area map?
  • Student travel pass?
  • Money to tide your son or daughter over in case of delays in receiving their financial support?

Continue reading Parents’ Guide | Part 5: The Final Checklist

Q&A: Nursing degree and diploma – the differences?

 

Choices adviser Shona McQuillan answers some frequently asked questions about two of Birmingham City University’s popular undergraduate nursing programmes.

What’s the main difference between the nursing degree (BSc Hons) and diploma (Dip HE) courses?

The main difference between the courses is the academic level at which students complete their studies. Students on the diploma course complete a total of 72 credits at level 4 and 168 credits at level 5 throughout the course. Degree students complete 120 credits in each year of the course, studying at level 4 in year one, level 5 in year two and level 6 in year three. The degree course, therefore, is more academically intensive than the diploma course. This is reflected in the degree requiring students to have higher entry qualifications than for the diploma. Find out more about the minimum entry requirements for both courses by clicking on the course titles here.

Is the diploma course more practical than the degree?

Not really. Both courses consist of 50 percent theory and 50 percent practice. Continue reading Q&A: Nursing degree and diploma – the differences?

UCAS Extra

UCAS Extra allows applicants who’ve used up all their choices on the UCAS application form and have not secured an offer of a place with these choices an additional chance to be considered for another course or university before Clearing starts.

It allows eligible applicants to approach individual universities to see if they can be accepted onto a course there.

To be eligible to use Extra you need to have:

• already made five choices;
• received decisions from all these choices; and
• either had no offers or declined all the offers you have received.

UCAS created the Extra scheme to specifically help those who are still seeking places to try and avoid having to go through Clearing if at all possible. Continue reading UCAS Extra

April 2009 Dip HE/ Grad Dip Nursing Students – Reminder

If you’ve firmly accepted an offer of a place at Birmingham City University on either our Diploma in Higher Education in Nursing or Graduate Diploma in Nursing course commencing in April 2009, please ensure that you complete and submit the required paperwork for your Criminal Records Bureau Disclosure and occupational health forms if you’ve not already done so. (Please note that if you’ve only very recently firmly accepted your offer and are awaiting the necessary paperwork for occupational health and CRB Disclosure, the faculty should be sending these to you shortly). It’s important that you do this now so that the necessary clearances, financial support and accommodation (if appropriate) can be processed or allocated in a timely manner.

You should receive information separately about applying for the NHS Bursary directly from the NHS Student Grants Unit whom we notify of your acceptance of offer once this information has been received from UCAS. Please act upon this information once you receive it.

If you wish to apply for university accommodation, you can do so online at http://www.bcu.ac.uk/accommodation/application.html.

If satisfactory CRB and occupational health clearances have not been received by the time you start the course, there could be delays in allowing you out on clinical placements and you won’t be able to fully enrol as a student of the University. If your bursary is delayed, you will need to have sufficient funds of your own to cover your living costs until such time that bursary funding has been confirmed. Don’t leave it until the last minute to send off this important paperwork – sorting it now can avoid such problems!

Creative Self Development Courses in Art & Design – Semester 2 Enrolment

At Birmingham City University’s Bournville Centre for Visual Arts, a range of shorter creative courses are on offer commencing in Semester 2. Perhaps you’ve always wanted to try watercolour painting or to take a course in photography. Maybe you’re a keen artist who would like to further develop your practice with input and guidance from a tutor or simply wish to explore a new medium. Our suite of Creative Self Development courses provide a means to study further without the pressure of working for a formal academic award and are available to students of all abilities and levels.

Courses on offer are:

* please note that students on this course are required to have completed an art foundation course before being able to access this course

Courses are offered on a part-time basis during either the daytime or evening, depending upon the actual course being studied.

If you’re interested in reserving a place on one of these courses, please contact Bournville Centre for Visual Arts on 0121 331 5775 or email us.

New Year, New Opportunities?

With the advent of a New Year, people often take time to reflect and start thinking about future aspirations. Maybe:

  • There’s something you’ve always been interested in – like learning a new skill or hobby, for example.
  • You’re considering a change of direction in terms of your career or professional development.
  • You want to do something to because you’re motivated by improving your knowledge in a particular area.

There are a whole host of ways you could go about making these changes – there may be local workshops, adult education classes or short courses provided by education providers in the area. For more significant changes, you could be looking at retraining through a degree or professional qualification.

Careers advice:

If you’d like to explore avenues for developing yourself or doing something different but you’re unsure about what you’d like to do, perhaps talking to a careers advisor could help. Visit http://careersadvice.direct.gov.uk/  for more information about contacting a qualified careers advisor.

Study options:

If you do decide to take up study; it doesn’t have to mean studying on a full-time course; there are a multitude of part-time or short course options that might be appropriate, depending on the subject you’re interested in. But, if you do want to consider more substantive study options, it’s important to be fully clued up on what’s available and what you’ll need to do. You’ll need to research courses, study commitment and costs for starters.

Finding a course to suit you:

Tools such as www.hotcourses.com can help you to find everything from short courses to postgraduate study in your area or further afield. Postgraduate study options can be researched at www.prospects.ac.uk. The UCAS website has a great course search function, allowing you to explore available full-time undergraduate courses. And, of course, university and college websites will tell you more about what’s on offer at particular institutions.

Money matters:

How much will the course you’re looking at cost? Is there any financial support available? Here are a few starting points you can use to find out more about possible sources of funding:

  • Information about financial help for adult learners can be found here
  • Want information about student financial support for University and Higher Education courses? Look here for more details.
  • Postgraduate funding is different to undergraduate funding and there is, generally, no financial support available through the government. However, there are exceptions to this, such as certain NHS-funded courses, Social Work courses and PGCE qualifications. Prospective postgraduate students often need to be resourceful in seeking out funding opportunities. If your proposed study is related to your current job role, is it feasible to talk to your employer about support for the course – either as study leave or in terms of paying for the course? Are there any relevant scholarships or bursaries available? The Prospects website has links to resources which can help you find any such schemes.

First steps:

Whatever spurs you on, you can start taking steps towards your goals and exploring options open to you. If you’d like to chat to a course adviser about any courses offered at Birmingham City University, please contact Choices on 0121 331 5595 or email us.