Tag Archives: networking

Event: Are you a Productivity Ninja?

How to be a Productivity Ninja Event on 12th November 2014, at BCU Parkside, 5 Cardigan Street, Birmingham.

Book your ticket here!

Information overload is a big problem.  We’re all overwhelmed with the amount of information and potential distraction we face in our work.  It’s no longer enough to just focus on your time management: it’s time to think about how you manage your attention and focus, your projects and actions and your choices and habits.  A Productivity Ninja is calm and prepared, but also skilled and ruthless in how he or she deals with the enemy that is information overload.  This 1.5 hour seminar will show you how to keep a zen-like calm as well as an agile ruthlessness, just like a Productivity Ninja.

The ticket price includes a signed copy of Graham Allcott’s best-selling “How to be a Productivity Ninja” book.

This event is organised by Think Productive and hosted by BCU.

 

Not everyone wants to be an entrepreneur

In a recent article, The End of Quiet Music, Alina Simone discusses her concerns with having to be entrepreneurial and ‘selling’ her music. Simone says:

 I was a singer, not a saleswoman. Not everyone wants to be an entrepreneur.

I dont agree with everything Simone suggests. For example, I have some concerns with the idea that patronage is the answer or that musicians can be supported by governments or other public institutions. However, I do have sympathy with the idea that not everyone is comfortable with being an entrepreneur. In fact, I come across this quite often. The sense that some, not all, individuals working within the creative and media industries will have to be entrepreneurial to get on, but are relunctance to fully embrace entrepreneurship.

Entrepreneurial practices require high levels of personal investment and as Angela McRobbie argues, it can lead to self-exploitation. Blaming yourself if things go wrong and working hard for little financial reward; for ‘the love of it’.

 There is nothing wrong with being enterprising but the overwhelming positivity associated with enterpreneurs and entrepreneurship can provoke uneasiness. It is something we actively discuss on the MA Media and Creative Enterprise. The challenges and risks are too often gloosed over. I hope this becomes part of the discussion for the Centre for Entrepreneurs who are currently investigating the media view of entrepreneurship.

ISBE conference

I recently attended the ISBE conference and delivered a paper with my colleague Steve Harding. The paper is called Collaborative Learning with Creative Enterprises in the EU – a case study approach.
The conference had many different strands but the bits of interest to me are nicely captured by Frances Brown in her blog. And if you like fancy visuals, Frances created a picture of her ‘takeaways’ too.

Creative industries track (and a tiny bit of social and enterprise education)
Networks and Networking – “Fitting in and standing out” Eleanor Shaw
Everyone was talking about networks whether it was musician-entrepreneurs spending time and money to be part of their community via doing free gigs and supporting others gigs or networking being used as a learning experience via peer information sharing.  An interesting presentation looked at a new business that set up in a mature industry but quickly became embedded in and central to the network.  The study looked at the journey from pre-embedding to deep embedding via strategic networking, with intent.  Actively planning roles of each member of the business to network with others on their particular employment levels e.g. director and director, manager and manager and for a particular purpose.  The human capital of networks and communities were also considered in terms of entrepreneurs feeding into the community and having positive impact via contacts and reputation and the occurrence of an informal sharing and barter system.
Intent
Intent was considered again in relation to creative industries with it’s overwhelming drive to set up business for practice rather than for business sake.  In this case the complexity of the industry was examined with differing levels of intent arising in the form of ‘tactical’ intent – driven by desire to practice, often working towards an ultimate future goal – and ‘pragmatic’ intent of those who had multiple businesses over the research period and displayed a weak attachment to the projects/businesses as long as they were practicing in some way.

The discussions about networks, social & cultural capital are particularly pertinent for students launching a career in the media and creative industries. I touched on that in a previous post.

Developing a Niche Business

Marina Ibrahim of Bizz Buzz gave students excellent insights into developing a niche business.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marina talked about networks and creative alliances as key to understanding your sector. She demonstrated how she makes good use of her contacts and if she needs further support, she creates a network to access that help. For example, she has set up a local Jelly and a Mastermind group. Continue reading Developing a Niche Business